March 2017 Atypical Life Income Report

Welcome to the third monthly income and expense report from the Atypical Life family. We are pleased to share this with all of you, so that you may have the inspiration to achieve financial independence and freedom from the man sooner. As an atypical family, this income and expense report will look very different to most family budgets, however, it is 100% real and is achievable under the right circumstances.

I share my finances to inspire others to reach for freedom earlier. I hope to show from my income and expense reports:

  • Income can be generated in multiple ways. The regular 9-5 job is not the only way to make money and is also the best way to be a slave to the man.
  • Lowering expenses is really the path towards financial freedom. The lower your expenses, the more you can save. Also, with lower expenses, it takes fewer savings to live on.
  • It is possible to have low expenses.
  • Becoming an expat is a great way to financial freedom
  • To keep me accountable.

Tracking Your Money

Keeping track of your money is the number one way to reach financial independence. We track all of our income and expenses and then analyze it all at the end of the month for you.

Using Personal Capital is the best way to aggregate all of your accounts into one nice easy view. With your accounts spread across so many different platforms, it is hard to get a whole picture of your finances. Personal Capital gives you a view of where you are, if you spent too much, saved too little, or went into debt. Keeping track of your Net Worth on Personal Capital is super easy.

The best part of Personal Capital’s service is that it is free! It fits in perfectly with our frugal sense and allows us to track and reach financial independence faster. Check out their retirement planner to estimate how far away you are from retirement. It is one of the best I have seen for those of us pursuing FIRE.

If you haven’t started tracking your finances, it is not too late to start. Give Personal Capital a try and you will soon be on your way to being a personal finance guru.

Income

IncomeAmount
Bonus$6,020
Company Match$1,112
Expat Income$1,266
Gifts Received$50
Interest$4
Investment$725
Salary (Mr. Atypical)$6,467
Salary (Mrs. Atypical)$131
Total$15,775

March was another great month for us in the Atypical household. We had our regular salary and our wonderful, but regular expat income. This expat income is a 20% location premium or hazard pay in expat vernacular. It is additional income for us that is grossed up by the company, so we do not have to pay taxes on it.

I was stoked in March when our company actually paid the Short-term Incentive Plan (STIP) at 100% funding this year. This amounted to a 7.75% bonus on my new annual salary. All of the extra funds got saved and invested with 50% going directly to the 401k, ~25% going to taxes and the final 25% paid out to me and invested in the HSA.

One problem with the 401k contribution this month is that it still has not posted. I received my bonus on March 10, and the $3,010 that were “contributed” to the 401k, have still not shown up in my account. I was waiting for the salary contribution posted (around April 7) before approaching HR about this lack of contribution. I am not sure of the company’s intent here, but it seems they are holding on to my money for their own gain rather than paying it out to me on time.

My company has a fairly generous 401k match of 9%, as long as we contribute 6% to the 401k. This goal is very easy for us to achieve, as we contribute 50% of our income to the 401k. There is one caveat to my 401k contributions, though. They are only calculated on salary, expat income is not included, so 50% of $6,466 goes to the 401k each month to ready us for an atypical life of freedom. The 401k matching contribution is free money and we make nearly $6,000 per year from this income source.

March is when all of my VTSAX investments pay out dividends, so we had a $725 dividend payment. The payment for this quarter was very low compared with past payments. Even though I have more investments than I did in December 2016, the dividend payout was down 25% on a per share basis.

Expenses

ExpensesAmount
Business$550
Fees$8
Food$448
Home$325
Insurance$74
Medical Expenses$70
Shopping$427
Taxes$2,730
Travel$890
Utilities$29
Total$5,551

Our March expenses were to be expected and slightly over budget! They were the highest of 2017 so far because of hosting my parents in China for a few weeks.

The bonus we received in January from the local Chinese government got put to further good use this month on a new lens for our Micro 4/3 camera. The Olympus E-M1 that we bought in February is complemented nicely now by a wide-angle Panasonic 7-14 mm f/4 lens. This lens gives us a new perspective to use and will continue to expand the possibilities of beautiful photography for our blogs. Along with that, we improved our blogs with new plugins, so keep an eye out for new formatting. Because the bonus was paid in RMB to a Chinese bank account, we were not able to invest it without the fees and hassle of a wire transfer, so we have decided to allocate it to business expansion.

Because my parents are here, our budget, in general, got overstretched. We are trying to show them a good time and that involves traveling. We took a week long trip to Gansu province where we got to see numerous Danxia formations and got the must do in China done, visited the Great Wall. We are also getting more food out at restaurants as a result of them here. Introducing them to the local food is enjoyable, but certainly more expensive. It gives us a feel for what the cost will be to live when we have kids in the future.

In addition to the business expansion from the Chinese bonus, we treated my parents to covering the flight cost to Gansu and back. Both of their birthdays are in April, and we are so appreciative of them coming to visit, we felt that covering the flight was a great idea.

Our Gansu trip spread from March 28 – April 4, so is split over 2 months again. The portion spent in March was $876, however, half of the non-flight cost will be paid back to us by my parents. because they do not have a free way to get RMB to spend, we are covering all costs and they will reimburse us at the end of the trip via PayPal. Keep an eye out for our upcoming post about our Gansu trip.

Shopping

The shopping budget was over this month at $427. The reason we were over budget again is due to my parent’s trip to China. Because we can’t buy some things in China (I wear a size 46 shoe 13US), we bought them from the US and had my parents bring them to us. This saw the purchase of a pair of Chaco sandals for me, a pair of cycling sandals to replace the ones that I broke last year, and 2 horse riding helmets for Mrs. Atypical. The last one was a mistake due to a website malfunction and we will get reimbursed for the helmet when it gets returned to the store.

Mrs. Atypical and I are very into exercise and use it to spend much of our free time. Since cycling here is not too fun and the air is not too clean (think a thick headache inducing smog 150+ PM2.5) she asked for a bike trainer so she could ride inside. There was no way I could say no to that, so we purchased one that I would ride as well, and she is well on her way to getting stronger because of this purchase. I did not buy the cheapest version of a trainer because tools should be bought to last, and good quality can make all the difference. In the pursuit of freedom, we cannot forget to live and enjoy ourselves.

Medical

Our insurance for the month is on an accrual basis because we paid for the year entirely in December. We dropped our company sponsored health insurance that cost us $250 per month and the company $750 per month in favor of a local insurance company that was ~5300 RMB or $890. This covers us for all medical expenses in Greater China and also qualifies us to use the supercharged investment vehicle, the HSA.

We had our first medical costs of 2017 this month with the purchase of 12 months worth of birth control. China has it right because birth control is over the counter. There is no way they could have maintained the one-child policy for years without easy access to birth control. In the US, the government has put up barriers to access which does not make any sense.

Home

Our home cost remained at $325 and will remain at exactly that level until we finish the contract up in China. Our internet was paid in full this month for the following year. For the service (fine during the day, slow as dirt at night), the price is reasonable at $255 for the year or $21 per month.

Food

Our grocery and dining budget ballooned this month from my parent’s visit to $427. With $335 spent on groceries for the month, it is evident that we were stockpiling ingredients for the month ahead. I purchased 10 lbs of butter in preparation of baking wonderful Western sweets. Since we get the butter delivered, I thought it was better to stockpile before it gets hot here to stop melting during delivery. I am always happy that the cost of food in China is so low beside our splurges for sanity’s sake on butter, sugar, and chocolate!

The HSA Experiment

Our HSA, currently residing at HSA Bank, incurs a fee of $2.50 per month for a balance under $5,000. We will incur this fee and an additional $3 per month on that account, so we can keep all of our HSA money invested at TD Ameritrade and buy VTI, the best possible investment vehicle. VTI is the ETF equivalent of my favorite mutual fund VTSAX, Vanguard Total US Stock Market Admiral Shares.

My second month using this platform was much more successful than the first month. I did not make the same mistake as I did in February with incorrectly moving funds from HSA Bank to/from TD Ameritrade. I was able to put an additional $3,500 into the HSA bringing my total investment to $5,000 for 2017.

The investments made into the HSA will save us a good amount of taxes for 2017. At the 25% tax bracket, if assumed the HSA contributions are taken off the top, it is $1,688 in tax savings. I will be in the 15% tax bracket after all of our savings so, even there our tax savings are $1,013. These savings help to accelerate our path to financial freedom.

Taxes

Everybody hates taxes. They eat away at our income and we never even get a chance to see it. Taxes were 49% of our expenses for March totaling $2,729.

There are 2 certainties in life, death and taxes. ~Benjamin Franklin

Our taxes for March were extraordinarily high because of the tax withheld on the bonus. I initially thought it was way too high because they withheld 25% federal income tax from it, however it ended up correct. Because it is additional income above the estimated tax that I pay on my normal salary, it is taxed at my max tax rate of 25%. The 25% income tax was levied on the entire bonus, even though 50% of it went to the 401k in pre-tax contributions. Due to the expat package, I do not pay real income tax, but estimated income tax to the company, the accounting is done differently. The tax rate should probably be 15% since my saving plan for the year will put me in the 15% tax bracket but is not worth arguing.

After doing a review of my tax situation, I approached my tax preparation company about reducing my estimated taxes for 2017 and the future. I showed that I would save into pre-tax investment vehicles:

  • $18,000 to the 401k
  • $5,500 Mr. Atypical Traditional IRA
  • $5,500 Mrs. Atypical Traditional IRA
  • $6,750 to the family HSA
  • Total Value of $35,750

This is able to reduce my taxable income significantly, and when combined with personal and standard deductions on the 1040, it brings our taxable income very low. The purpose of reducing our tax withholding is because we know best how to take care of our money. The government obviously does not know what is best for me. We can put our money to work as soon as possible by investing in VTSAX and VTI, without waiting for a tax refund at the end of the year. This can gain us upwards of 12 months of growth (or decline…). It also allows us to raise our contributions throughout the year to achieve a healthy total portfolio to pursue freedom sooner.

I would never use a tax preparation company right now if it was not provided by the company. Taxes are not nearly as complicated as they are made out to be. Due to the tax equalization policy that my company implements for us, we have to have a professional tax preparation firm handle our taxes.

Savings

In total, we made $10,239 in March and were able to save the majority of that into investment funds. It was a very successful month financially, but that doesn’t matter if we did not enjoy ourselves. We should not kill ourselves to reach freedom. You should enjoy life all the time, knowing in the future it can be even better.

“Love the life you have, while you create the life of your dreams.” ~Hal Elrod

My parents came to China to visit and we got to go on a wonderful trip to Gansu province to check out the scenery and mountains there. It is nice to know you are loved and that people will travel half way around the world to come and visit.

How was your March? Are you heading towards financial independence as well? Let me know in the comments below.

If you enjoyed this post or found it useful, share the love and pin it to Pinterest!

March 2017 financial review

February 2017 Atypical Life Income Report

Welcome to the second monthly income and expense report from the Atypical Life family. We are pleased to share this with all of you, so that may have the inspiration to achieve financial independence and freedom from the man sooner. As an atypical family, this income and expense report will look very different to most family budgets, however, it is 100% real and is achievable under the right circumstances.

I share my finances to inspire others to reach for freedom earlier. I hope to show from my income and expense reports:

  • Income can be generated in multiple ways. The regular 9-5 job is not the only way to make money and is also the best way to be a slave to the man.
  • Lowering expenses is really the path towards financial freedom. The lower your expenses, the more you can save. Also, with lower expenses, it takes fewer savings to live on.
  • It is possible to have low expenses.
  • Becoming an expat is a great way to financial freedom
  • To keep me accountable.

Tracking Your Money

Keeping track of your money is the number one way to reach financial independence. We track all of our income and expenses and then analyze it all at the end of the month for you.

Using Personal Capital is the best way to aggregate all of your accounts into one nice easy view. With your accounts spread across so many different platforms, it is hard to get a whole picture of your finances. Personal Capital gives you a view of where you are, if you spent too much, saved too little, or went into debt. Keeping track of your Net Worth on Personal Capital is super easy.

The best part of Personal Capital’s service is that it is free! It fits in perfectly with our frugal sense and allows us to track and reach financial independence faster. Check out their retirement planner to estimate how far away you are from retirement. It is one of the best I have seen for those of us pursuing FIRE.

If you haven’t started tracking your finances, it is not too late to start. Give Personal Capital a try and you will soon be on your way to being a personal finance guru.

Income

IncomeAmount
Company Match$750
Expat Income$1,266
Interest$4
Salary (Mr. Atypical)$6,467
Salary (Mrs. Atypical)$116
Total$8,619

February was another good month for us in the Atypical household. We had our regular salary and our wonderful, but regular expat income. This expat income is a 20% location premium or hazard pay in expat vernacular. It is additional income for us that is grossed up by the company, so we do not have to pay taxes on it.

We saw our annual inflation adjustment to the salary this month. This year was actually the largest inflation adjustment I have ever had at 2.16%. It usually is exactly 2%, so I was happy to see them round up the numbers to an even $77,600 annual salary. They missed the adjustment to our 20% hazard pay, but I expect that to be made up in March in the next paycheck.

My company has a fairly generous 401k match at 9%, as long as we contribute 6% to the 401k. This goal is very easy for us to achieve, as we contribute 50% of our income to the 401k. There is one caveat to my 401k contributions, though. They are only calculated on salary, expat income is not included, so 50% of $6,330 goes to the 401k each month to ready us for an atypical life of freedom. 401k matching contributions is free money and we make nearly $6,000 per year from this income source.

Expenses

ExpensesAmount
Business$1,170
Fees$44
Food$216
Home$325
Insurance$74
Shopping$252
Taxes$1,065
Travel$393
Utilities$283
Total$3,822

Our February expenses were on track and on budget! They were higher than January, but that was expected because we had a couple of lumpy expenses.

The bonus we received in January from the local Chinese government got put to good use this month on a new Olympus E-M1 mirrorless camera and Olympus Pro 12-40 mm f/2.8 lens to help grow our blogging and photography businesses. Along with that, we improved our blogs with new plugins, so keep an eye out for new formatting. Because the bonus was paid in RMB to a Chinese bank account, we were not able to invest it without the fees and hassle of a wire transfer, so we have decided to allocate it to business expansion.

I managed to keep the shopping budget down to below $300 again this month, which was a huge success. Partly, this is accounting because we are counting the new camera as a business expense and not a shopping expense. However, we kept our expenses low by not purchasing frivolent goods. Our shopping consisted of a ~$100 gift to our personal driver as a thank you gift over the popular Chinese holiday, Chinese New Years. We also had the expense of repairing our other Olympus camera because the shutter locked shut in Indonesia. These 2 expenses combined to be $200 out of the total $250 for the month. After nearly 5 years of spending upwards of $600 per month on “things”, I am extremely happy to be able to so quickly reduce this amount. It may be because we have finally acquired most of the things we need, or that I am finally pursuing freedom with the attention it deserves.

Our insurance for the month is on an accrual basis because we paid for the year entirely in December. We dropped our company sponsored health insurance that cost us $250 per month and the company $750 per month in favor of a local insurance company that was ~5300 RMB or $890. This covers us for all medical expenses in Greater China and also qualifies us to use the super charged investment vehicle, the HSA.

Our home cost remained at $325 and will remain at exactly that level until we finish the contract up in China. Our internet was paid in full this month for the following year. For the service (fine during the day, slow as dirt at night), the price is reasonable at $255 for the year or $21 per month.

Our grocery and dining budget was pretty low for the month at only $210. We were traveling for 5 days out of this month, so those food expenses are included in Travel expenses. Comparing our extrapolated January spending of $183 to the extrapolated value for February of $256, we see higher expenses, but we were not trying to run out before vacation either. I am always happy that the cost of food in China is so low besides our splurges for sanity’s sake on butter, sugar, and chocolate!

The HSA Experiment

Our HSA, which has finally been successfully moved from MyBenefitWallet to HSA Bank, incurs a fee of $2.50 per month for a balance under $5,000. We will incur this fee and an additional $3 per month on that account, so we can move it to TD Ameritrade and buy VTI, the best possible investment vehicle.

During my first month using this platform, I made a mistake. I was not vigilant while transferring funds between the HSA and Investment account and accidentally withdrew $2,000 from the investment account leaving me a ($1,700) deficit in the account. When I got the email about a cash balance debit error, I was especially confused. I had never heard this term before, but after review on the HSA Bank website, I figured out what happened and promptly replaced and added more funds to TD Ameritrade.

My first foray into investing on TD Ameritrade was successful, but I am a huge fan of mutual funds. I much prefer them over ETFs because you can just add however much money you want, not having to buy whole shares at a time. The TD Ameritrade platform is very busy and seems to be optimized for day-traders and those few that spend tons of time trading stocks. For those of us that are pursuing freedom, we must remember:

Keep it simple, stupid. KISS

Taxes

Everybody hates taxes. They eat away at our income and we never even get a chance to see it. Taxes were 28% of our expenses for January.

There are 2 certainties in life, death and taxes. ~Benjamin Franklin

After doing a review of my tax situation, I approached my tax preparation company about reducing my estimated taxes for 2017 and the future. I showed that I would save into pre-tax investment vehicles:

  • $18,000 to the 401k
  • $5,500 Mr Atypical Traditional IRA
  • $5,500 Mrs. Atypical Traditional IRA
  • $6,750 to the family HSA
  • Total Value of $35,750

This is able to reduce my taxable income significantly, and when combined with personal and standard deductions on the 1040, it brings our taxable income very low. The purpose of reducing our tax withholding is because we know best how to take care of our money. The government obviously does not know what is best for me. We can put our money to work as soon as possible by investing in VTSAX and VTI, without waiting for a tax refund at the end of the year. This can gain us upwards of 12 months of growth (or decline…). It also allows us to raise our contributions throughout the year to achieve a healthy total portfolio to pursue freedom sooner.

I would never use a tax preparation company right now if it was not provided by the company. Taxes are not nearly as complicated as they are made out to be. Due to the tax equalization policy that my company implements for us, we have to have a professional tax preparation firm handle our taxes.

Savings

In total, we made $4,621 in February and were able to save the majority of that into investment funds. It was a very successful month financially, but that doesn’t matter if we did not enjoy ourselves. We should not kill ourselves to reach freedom. You should enjoy life all the time, knowing in the future it can be even better.

“Love the life you have, while you create the life of your dreams.” ~Hal Elrod

We enjoyed Indonesia and hanging out with friends in China. Indonesia was an amazing break from work and recharged my batteries both mentally and physically.

How was your February? Are you heading towards financial independence as well? Let me know in the comments below.

If you enjoyed this post, please share it on Pinterest!

financial review February 2017 Atypical Life

January 2017 Atypical Life Income Report

Welcome to the first monthly financial review from the Atypical Life family. We are pleased to share this with all of you, so that you may have the inspiration to achieve financial independence and freedom from the man sooner. As an atypical family, this financial review will look very different to most family budgets, however, it is 100% real and is achievable under the right circumstances. So let’s begin.

I share my finances to inspire others to reach for freedom earlier. I hope to show from my income and expense reports:

  • Income can be generated in multiple ways. The regular 9-5 job is not the only way to make money and is also the best way to be a slave to the man.
  • Lowering expenses is really the path towards financial freedom. The lower your expenses, the more you can save. Also, with lower expenses, it takes fewer savings to live on.
  • It is possible to have low expenses.
  • Becoming an expat is a great way to financial freedom
  • To keep me accountable.

Tracking Your Money

Keeping track of your money is the number one way to reach financial independence. We track all of our income and expenses and then analyze it all at the end of the month for you.

Using Personal Capital is the best way to aggregate all of your accounts into one nice easy view. With your accounts spread across so many different platforms, it is hard to get a whole picture of your finances. Personal Capital gives you a view of where you are, if you spent too much, saved too little, or went into debt. Keeping track of your Net Worth on Personal Capital is super easy.

The best part of Personal Capital’s service is that it is free! It fits in perfectly with our frugal sense and allows us to track and reach financial independence faster. Check out their retirement planner to estimate how far away you are from retirement. It is one of the best I have seen for those of us pursuing FIRE.

If you haven’t started tracking your finances, it is not too late to start. Give Personal Capital a try and you will soon be on your way to being a personal finance guru.

Income

January was a good month for us in the Atypical household. We had our regular salary and our wonderful, but regular expat income. This expat income is a 20% location premium or hazard pay in expat vernacular. It is additional income for us that is grossed up by the company, so we do not have to pay taxes on it.

IncomeAmount
Bonus$5,196.00
Company Match$569.70
Expat Income$1,266.00
Gifts Received$100.00
Interest Income$4.93
Misc. Income$170.94
Salary$6,330.00
Total Income$13,637.57

Bonus Windfall!!

We finally had our windfall of a bonus that we have been expecting since July last year. This bonus was paid by the local government here in China as a talent award to individuals working in the area that applied for it. We had to put a lot of effort into the acquisition of this award, but $5,196 is worth the effort when it can bring us closer to freedom. The money was all deposited into a Chinese bank account, so we cannot pull it out for investing. The question now is how to treat this bonus? I think we will use it to double down on our pursuit of freedom with investment into blogging and self-employment.

My company has a fairly generous 401k match at 9%, as long as we contribute 6% to the 401k. This goal is very easy for us to achieve since we contribute 50% of our income to the 401k. There is one caveat to my 401k contributions, though. They are only calculated on salary, expat income is not included. 50% of $6,330 goes to the 401k each month to ready us for a truly atypical life of freedom. 401k matching contributions is free money and we make nearly $6,000 per year from this income source.

The company I work for also has a health promotion program to help them bring down healthcare costs. This program works on points from pedometers and other health monitoring inputs to give us a maximum earning potential of $1,000 per year for the 2 of us. We both wear Garmin watches to track our steps, sleep, and exercise. I use it also to track some of my bike rides that then get uploaded to the company tracking website for bonus points towards our award. All of this is to say, I withdrew $140 from the program in January.

Expenses

Our January expenses were on track and on budget!

ExpensesAmount
Fees$2.50
Food$117.54
Home$325.00
Insurance$73.91
Shopping$288.36
Taxes$1,065.46
Travel$839.86
Total$2,712.63

I managed to keep the shopping budget down to below $300 this month, which was a huge success. January is my birthday, so we usually blow by that amount on birthday presents which we need to cut back on. This January I got birthday presents of long lusted after tools for bike repair. For those of you that are into bikes, I got a Taiwanese equivalent of the Park Tool TS-1.1 truing stand for wheel building and I also got a nice torque wrench and bits for bike repair. I also got several other cycling tools to fill out my bike shop worth of tools.

Clothes shopping this month were for Mrs. Atypical. Our vacation that started in January and went on into February was a bike touring trip to Indonesia and she needed some new cycling clothes for comfort on the long days in the saddle. There will be a separate post about our wonderful and relaxing trip to Indonesia. Needless to say, we spent a total of $780 there during January and the rest of the trip cost rolled over into February.

I do accrual accounting for our personal finances. Basically, this means, that if I paid for flights to Indonesia in December, they show up as expenses when they are actually used. So half of the expense of flights to Indonesia are in January and the other half are in February. This type of accounting is typically done in large businesses where it is required by law and not by individuals, however, I feel it makes the most amount of sense. We should account for things when they happen, not when they are charged to the credit card.

Our insurance for the month is also on an accrual basis because we paid for the year entirely in December. We dropped our company sponsored health insurance that cost us $250 per month and the company $750 per month in favor of a local insurance company that was ~5300 RMB or $890 for all of 2017. This covers us for all medical expenses in China and also qualifies us to use the supercharged investment vehicle, the HSA.

Our home cost remained at $325 and will remain at exactly that level until we finish the contract up in China. I was able to negotiate a housing cost into our contract of $325 because that is what my rent had been since I started working for my company out of college. The expat contract tries to keep your expenses the same as when you were living in the USA, so if I had owned a house in the US, I would not have to pay the company rent on my apartment in China. I cannot complain about rent of $325 to live in an over-priced ritzy-glitzy $1,000,000 high-rise apartment. It also includes all utilities besides phone and internet.

Our HSA, which has finally been successfully moved from MyBenefitWallet to HSA Bank, incurs a fee of $2.50 per month for a balance under $5,000. We will incur this fee and an additional $3 per month investment fee on that account, so we can move it to TD Ameritrade and buy VTI, the best possible investment vehicle.

Our grocery and dining budget was pretty low for the month at only $118. This has to be taken with a grain of salt, though, because we were traveling for 12 days out of that month. So an extrapolated spending would be $183, which is still amazing. We received lots of Christmas gifts in January, since our mail forwarding service is very slow to arrive to China, and in them we received all of the candy we could dream of! Sweets are definitely one of the top missed items living abroad in China.

Taxes

Everybody hates taxes. They eat away at our income and we never even get a chance to see it. Taxes were 40% of our expenses for January.

TaxesAmount
Federal$350.00
Medicare$102.44
Social Security$438.02
State$175.00
Total$1,065.46

After doing a review of my tax situation, I approached my tax preparation company about reducing my estimated taxes for 2017 and the future. I showed that I would save into pre-tax investment vehicles:

There are 2 certainties in life, death and taxes. ~Benjamin Franklin

  • $18,000 to the 401k
  • $5,500 Mr. Atypical Traditional IRA
  • $5,500 Mrs. Atypical Traditional IRA
  • $6,750 to the family HSA
  • Total Value of $35,750

This is able to reduce my taxable income significantly, and when combined with personal and standard deductions on the 1040, it brings our taxable income to around $20,000. The purpose of reducing our tax withholding is because we know best how to take care of our money. The government obviously does not know what is best for me. We can put our money to work as soon as possible by investing in VTSAX and VTI, without waiting for a tax refund at the end of the year. This can gain us upwards of 12 months of growth (or decline…). It also allows us to raise our contributions throughout the year to achieve a healthy total portfolio to pursue financial and personal freedom sooner.

I would never use a tax preparation company right now if it was not provided by the company. Taxes are not nearly as complicated as they are made out to be. Due to the tax equalization policy that my company implements for us, we have to have a professional tax preparation firm handle our taxes.

Profit

In total, we made $10,953 in January and were able to save the majority of that into investment funds. It was a very successful month financially, but that doesn’t matter if we did not enjoy ourselves. We should not kill ourselves to reach freedom. You should enjoy life all the time, knowing in the future it can be even better.

“Love the life you have, while you create the life of your dreams.” ~Hal Elrod

We enjoyed Indonesia and hanging out with friends in China. Indonesia was an amazing break from work and recharged my batteries both mentally and physically.

How was your January? Are you heading towards financial independence as well? Let me know in the comments below.

If you enjoyed this post or found it useful, please share it on Pinterest!

The Power of Tracking – Track and Improve with Ease

How do we know we have reached financial independence?
How much money do we have?
How much money did we spend widgets this month?
Where did all of our money go?
Why do we live paycheck to paycheck?
Why can’t I lose weight?
How much do I actually go to the gym?
etc. etc. etc.
All of these questions and many, many more can be answered by tracking. Just the act of tracking  will make you more aware of your habits, and you habits will invariably improve without any effort beyond tracking.

Disclamer: I am an engineer by training

As an engineer, I enjoy tracking many different parameters which I later analyze. Just to list what I track:

  • Cycling: miles, speed, cadence, heart rate, power output, etc.
  • Health: pedometer (for work), sleep, illnesses, immunizations, doctor’s visits
  • Finances: All expenses and income, investment growth, estimated time to financial independence
  • Work: hours spent at work, excess days at work
  • Values of bikes and cameras, and when they were purchased
  • Lists of items wanted (wish list)
  • Destinations traveled to and ones remaining unseen
  • etc.

This above list does not include the numerous metrics I am required to track for work, since that list is not one anyone reading here (possibly while at work) cares much about.

What gets measured gets improved.  ~Peter Drucker

Peter hit the nail  squarely on the head with the above quote. What gets measured, gets improved with no effort, just from the exercise of measurement. From measuring, you become explicitly aware of effort applied and become more active in passive activities.

Tracking finances is a fine pursuit and one that can bring about financial independence much more quickly than without tracking. It truly is amazing to see how much money can be spent in a given time period and what all of this money is spent on.
This does not mean it is not possible to reach financial independence without tracking. My parents are a good example of this. Because they never connected their bank accounts to the internet, it is more difficult to passively track your finances. They never needed to track their finances, since they were by nature frugal people. Tracking brings frugality to the masses.

My financial tracking experience 

I started tracking my finances after finishing up college before starting my first real job. By tracking I was able to see where all my expenses were going to, though I could not control many of them, as I had to buy appliances and essentials for the house I was moving into after college. Even though these expenses were required, I was able to minimize them because I was tracking and spread them out over time instead of racking them all up at once on a credit card that would then charge outrageous interest rates. My eyes were opened from the beginning to the expenses of the “real world”.
I have been proud of saying that I managed my finances down to the razors edge. I was out of cash and had $13 in my bank accounts when I started work and my first pay check came. Looking back, I am no longer proud of that achievement, but see it as money wasted on frivolous consumerism leading up to working life. At this point, I start to save more money and dig out from the debt accumulated by going to college out-of-state. By tracking finances closely, I was able to pay off $30,000 of student loans in 2 years and another $20,000 of student loans from my wife, in an additional year. Tracking my finances enabled me to make the decisions to move money to the right places at the right times and pursue a life of freedom.

Tracking for the masses

For the vast majority of us, before we started tracking finances, we were following the typical life, just keeping up with the Jones’s. Tracking and measurement can make an atypical life achievable for more of the population. It allows the rest of us, who are not pre-wired for frugal living and non-commercial tendencies, to view the game that is playing out. To be able to see where money comes from and goes, all in one place gives us the power to change.
Once we start to track and the changes start as a result, then we can see the benefit of tracking. This then compounds, when we start to make conscious changes in our habits to reduce spending further.  This snowball effect can put us on the quick path to financial freedom and independence.
I think all would agree that to not have to worry about money is extremely liberating. Those with the highest net worth’s never have to worry since their money will not run out in their lifetimes, but for the rest of us, worrying about money seems, unfortunately so, natural. Tracking our money can liberate us from the uncertainty, since we do not have to wonder how much is spent when and if our balances are enough to support spending. Through tracking, we now know definitively, either yes we have enough, or no we do not.

Where to track

 There are many places to track your finances, and in future posts, I will highlight these. I have used many platforms over the years and they all have their pros and cons, with no one platform being right for everyone. Check out these platforms:
  • Personal Capital (personal favorite online and mobile platform)
  • Mint by Intuit (another very good online platform)
  • Credit Karma (continues to add functionality to be an all in one financial tracker)
  • Gnucash (open-source software for true double-entry accounting)

Final Thoughts

No amount of tracking, can force us to make the right decisions financially if we are too caught up in the consumerist mindset. However, tracking can put us on the path towards financial independence if we are willing. Let the power of tracking free you from the bindings of financial dependence.

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tracking, measuring, finances, budgets, expenses, income